ICENECDEV is accredited with the following organizations


UNCCD Convention

The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa (UNCCD) is a Convention to combat desertification and mitigate the effects of drought through national action programs that incorporate long-term strategies supported by international cooperation and partnership arrangements.

The Convention, the only convention stemming from a direct recommendation of the Rio Conference's Agenda 21, was adopted in Paris, France on 17 June 1994 and entered into force in December 1996. It is the only internationally legally binding framework set up to address the problem of desertification. The Convention is based on the principles of participation, partnership and decentralization—the backbone of Good Governance and Sustainable Development. It has 195 parties, making it near universal in reach. On 28 March 2013, Canada became the first country to withdraw from the convention.[1]

To help publicise the Convention, 2006 was declared "International Year of Deserts and Desertification" but debates have ensued regarding how effective the International Year was in practice.

Desertification, along with climate change and the loss of biodiversity, were identified as the greatest challenges to sustainable development during the 1992 Rio Earth Summit. Established in 1994, UNCCD is the sole legally binding international agreement linking environment and development to sustainable land management. The Convention addresses specifically the arid, semi-arid and dry sub-humid areas, known as the drylands, where some of the most vulnerable ecosystems and peoples can be found. In the 10-Year Strategy of the UNCCD (2008-2018) that was adopted in 2007, Parties to the Convention further specified their goals: "to forge a global partnership to reverse and prevent desertification/land degradation and to mitigate the effects of drought in affected areas in order to support poverty reduction and environmental sustainability".

The Convention’s 195 parties work together to improve the living conditions for people in drylands, to maintain and restore land and soil productivity, and to mitigate the effects of drought. The UNCCD is particularly committed to a bottom-up approach, encouraging the participation of local people in combating desertification and land degradation. The UNCCD secretariat facilitates cooperation between developed and developing countries, particularly around knowledge and technology transfer for sustainable land management.

As the dynamics of land, climate and biodiversity are intimately connected, the UNCCD collaborates closely with the other two Rio Conventions; the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), to meet these complex challenges with an integrated approach and the best possible use of natural resources.

ICENECDEV every year organized activities on World Day to Combat Desertification in Cameroon to promote and push the agenda of this convention.

http://www.unccd.int/en/Pages/default.aspx

UN GLOBAL COMPACT

The United Nations Global Compact is a United Nations initiative to encourage businesses worldwide to adopt sustainable and socially responsible policies, and to report on their implementation. The UN Global Compact is a principle-based framework for businesses, stating ten principles in the areas of human rights, labour, the environment and anti-corruption. Under the Global Compact, companies are brought together with UN agencies, labour groups and civil society. Cities can join the Global Compact through the Cities Programme.[1]

The UN Global Compact is the world's largest corporate sustainability (aka corporate social responsibility) initiative with 13000 corporate participants and other stakeholders over 170 countries[2] with two objectives: "Mainstream the ten principles in business activities around the world" and "Catalyse actions in support of broader UN goals, such as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)".[3] Moving forward, The UN Global Compact and its signatories are deeply invested and enthusiastic about supporting work towards the SDGs.[4]

The UN Global Compact was announced by then UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan in an address to the World Economic Forum on January 31, 1999,[5] and was officially launched at UN Headquarters in New York on July 26, 2000.The Global Compact Office works off of a mandate set out by the UN General Assembly as an organization that "promotes responsible business practices and UN values among the global business community and the UN System."[6] The UN Global Compact is a founding member of the United Nations Sustainable Stock Exchanges (SSE) initiative along with the Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI), the United Nations Environment Programme Finance Initiative (UNEP-FI), and the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD).

The Ten Principles

The UN Global Compact was initially launched with nine Principles. On June 24, 2004, during the first Global Compact Leaders Summit, Kofi Annan announced the addition of the tenth principle against corruption in accordance with the United Nations Convention Against Corruption adopted in 2003.

Human Rights

Businesses should:

  • Principle 1: Support and respect the protection of internationally proclaimed human rights; and
  • Principle 2: Make sure that they are not complicit in human rights abuses.

Labor Stabdards

Businesses should uphold:

  • Principle 3: the freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining;
  • Principle 4: the elimination of all forms of forced and compulsory labour;
  • Principle 5: the effective abolition of child labour; and
  • Principle 6: the elimination of discrimination in employment and occupation.

Environment

Businesses should:

  • Principle 7: support a precautionary approach to environmental challenges;
  • Principle 8: undertake initiatives to promote environmental responsibility; and
  • Principle 9: encourage the development and diffusion of environmentally friendly technologies.

Anti-Corruption

  • Principle 10: Businesses should work against corruption in all its forms, including extortion and bribery.;

Local Networks of the Global Compact

Local networks of the Global Compact advance the initiative and its ten principles at a country level. Currently there are approximately 85 Local Networks in total. These networks help companies and non profit organizations understand what responsible business means within diverse national, cultural, and linguistic contexts. Additionally, there are related programs for particular topics of interest, such as the Business for Peace initiative, that bring awareness to businesses and other organizations about instability and conflict, such that organizations can help to address these concerns from their own perspective and with the assistance of their local networks.[18] Local connections to supplement the international connections made by the Global Compact at large can help to broaden the engagement and impact of members. Local Networks are independent, self-governed and self managed entities, and work closely with the UN Global Compact's New York headquarters, and coordinate as points of contact for UN Global Compact signatories in their respective countries.

ICENECDEV organized multi stakeholder sensitization workshops on the ten principles of United Nations Global Compact to encourage Businesses/Companies, Civil society organizations, associations to join UN global Compact.

https://www.unglobalcompact.org/

United Nations Department of Public Information(UNDPI)

Overview

The Department of Public Information (DPI) was established in 1946, by General Assembly resolution 13 (I), to promote global awareness and understanding of the work of the United Nations. DPI undertakes this goal through radio, television, print, the Internet, video-conferencing and other media tools.
The Department reports annually on its work to the UN General Assembly's Committee on Information. The Committee, which meets once a year, is responsible for overseeing the work of DPI and for providing it guidance on policies, programmes and activities of the Department.
The United Nations Department of Public Information (DPI) is tasked with raising public awareness and support of the work of the United Nations through strategic communications campaigns, media and relationships with civil society groups. The Department aims to accomplish this through its three Divisions.
The Strategic Communications Division (SCD) formulates and launches global information campaigns on UN issues. The Division also manages its network of 63 UN Information Centres (also known as information services or information offices) around the world in order to disseminate information to the public.
The News and Media Division (NMD) works with news outlets from around the world in all media - television, radio, internet - to disseminate information on the United Nations and its work. This includes media accreditation and liaison for journalists to cover day-to-day operations; providing live coverage, through video, audio and still images, of all official meetings and other important events, then providing written summaries as they are concluded; preserves and makes accessible these visual and audio records; and produces and distributes original content for broadcast.
The Outreach Division (OD) serves the broadest audience - the general public - through special public events, publications, services for visitors including guided tours, library services, and partnerships with educational institutions and non-governmental organizations or NGOs.
ICENECDEV organized activities to commemorate the United Nations recognized days within the framework of our activities, project and programmes.
http://www.un.org/en/sections/department-public-information/about-dpi/index.htm.

United Nations Environment Programme(UNEP)
The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is the leading global environmental authority that sets the global environmental agenda, promotes the coherent implementation of the environmental dimension of sustainable development within the United Nations system and serves as an authoritative advocate for the global environment.
ICENECDEV participate as an observer in the second United Nations Environment Assembly(UNEA2) of the United Nations Environment Programme(UNEP) under the Major groups and stakeholders section.
http://www.unep.org.
World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO)
The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) is one of the 17 specialized agencies of the United Nations.WIPO was created in 1967 "to encourage creative activity, to promote the protection of intellectual property throughout the world.
WIPO currently has 188 member states, administers 26 international treaties, and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The current Director-General of WIPO is Francis Gurry, who took office on October 1, 2008. 186 of the UN Members as well as the Holy See and Niue are Members of WIPO. Non-members are the states of Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, Solomon Islands, South Sudan and Timor-Leste.
http://www.wipo.int/portal/en/index.html

 

 

Women Farmers Literacy Center


The project involve the building of hall of two floor of 8 squares metres at lower Bokova Village (mile15) to be used as a community hall for training on agricultural literacy and Community library. The goal of the project is to promote agricultural literacy and improve sustainable livelihood among 2,000 women farmers in village communities in Buea South West Region, Cameroon.

ADDRESS

  • Address: P.O Box 641 Lower Bokova, Mile 15. Buea South West Region,Cameroon
  • Email: info@icenecdev.org
  • Email: icenecdev2006@yahoo.com
  • Website: www.icenecdev.org
  • Tel: +237 674033583/ 243609311

ABOUT US

ICENECDEV is building a global grassroots to raise environmental awareness, promoting education and supporting community development programs by sharing practical ways in which people are addressing environmental conservation issues

PROGRAMMES

Each year ICENECDEV promote environmental conservation education in schools, prisons and local communities in Cameroon by establishing environmental clubs liaison with school administration in primary and secondary schools in Cameroon.

FOR DONATION

  • Name of Bank: Ecobank Cameroon
  • Account Name: ICENECDEV
  • Account Number: CM2110029260220132201840107
  • IBAN: CM2110029260220132201840107
  • Bank Swift Code: ECOCCMCX